How to Write an Interview Thank You Email

How to Write an Interview Thank You Email

A thank you note is considered a common courtesy after a job interview and demonstrates polished professionalism. Showing your appreciation for your interviewer’s time will solidify the rapport you established. Conversely, the absence of this gesture, at a time where putting your best foot forward is expected, could hurt your chances of landing the job.

Beyond exercising manners and business etiquette, the thank-you email presents you with a golden opportunity to re-sell yourself.

Perhaps you missed cues to present some of your talking points, leaving your interviewer without a full understanding of your skills. Your thank-you email is your chance to fill any possible gap and reinforce your fit for the job.

Timing is Everything

Of the factors that contribute to an effective thank-you note, the timing is perhaps the most sensitive. You’ll want to begin writing your email as soon as possible to ensure you have time to make it great.

The completed thank-you email should arrive in the interviewer’s inbox within 24 hours of the interview. Too much later, and you may have already been forgotten.

Note: Email thank-you notes are now considered the standard and always appropriate. We are often asked about when it would be better to write and mail a physical thank-you note.

It’s always possible that some, more traditional interviewers may appreciate receiving a thank-you note or card in the mail. It’s true that a mailed card will may help you stand out.

However, there’s also a chance this gesture could make you seem less responsive (takes longer) or tech-savvy. I would recommend sending your thanks via email in almost all cases. If you are dealing with a more traditional interviewer or company, you can address this in the tone and content of your thank-you email.

Be sure to steer clear of odd hours of the night. If the interviewer even manages to find your email buried in memos and junk mail, it may seem strange that you were up at 3am.

If you can manage it, one effective strategy is to send the email around the time when the interviewer first arrives at work the next morning; your note will be front and center.

Anatomy of the Ideal Interview Thank You Email – from Top to Bottom

Subject Line: Definitely include one. An email with a “no subject” line comes across as lazy and is easy to ignore. When you create your subject line, it should be specific and attention grabbing, but don’t try to be too creative. Make it clear what the email will be about by using the words “thank you” and perhaps the position title.

Salutation: When addressing your note, keep it professional, and accurate. Writing down “Dear Mr./Ms./Dr. *Last Name*” is always a solid choice. Make sure you know exactly how the interviewer’s last name is spelled. (If you have multiple interviewers, send separate emails, and double check to make sure you have correct names and emails matched up properly).

Be careful to check your assumptions! For instance, if the interviewer was a woman, do not assume that you can address her as “Mrs.,” even if you know she is married. Stick to “Ms.” in this case and you will be safe. (And make sure you always use the “Dr.” prefix when applicable!)

Opening paragraph: Now comes the part where you say, “thank you.” Begin your note with a sincere expression of gratitude for the time that was taken to speak with you (e.g “I appreciate the time you took to speak with me…”)

After this, you will want to grab their attention with a compliment about the interview process in some way, a key takeaway about the position or company that excites you, and how this takeaway solidifies your confidence in your ability to be the best fit for the job.

This will help the recruiter feel good about reading your note, let them know you paid attention, and reassure them of your interest.

Body: While keeping your email brief, you can use an additional 1-2 paragraphs to remind the interviewer of your best selling points and continue building rapport. Here are some ideas:

 Focus on your fit. Confidently assert your top selling points that align with the top job requirements. This can be an opportunity to mention something that didn’t come up in the interview or that you feel, in retrospect, you didn’t articulate well.

 Reference something specific about your conversation.This helps to show you were interested and listening and may jog the reader’s memory about your interview.

 Reiterate your interest. You can mention how the interview (and perhaps specific information provided by the interview) made you even more interested in the opportunity. Or if you forgot to ask good questions at the end of the interview, you may include one here, as an alternate way of showing your interest and engagement.

• Keep tone in mind. Be professional, but also aware of the culture of the office. For example, if your desired position requires creativity or upbeat customer relations, make sure your note doesn’t come off too stiff.

 Know your reader. Tailor your note to what you know about the reader. If you’re dealing with a busy senior manager, keep the note short and sweet and focused on the bottom line. If your interviewer was very focused on a particular job requirement, think about leading with a comment about it.

In all cases, remember to be professional, concise, and to the point.

Conclusion: It is always appropriate to say “thank you” again in some way as you are wrapping up your note. You can also use your conclusion to emphasize your interest in the position and express your desire to move forward in the hiring process.

If the interviewer mentioned a specific time frame in which to expect a follow-up, it is okay to reference that in your conclusion.